Archives

QandA

Rhythm and Blues

John and Craig talk homesickness and daddy issues before diving into a discussion on what Rhythm and Hues’s bankruptcy means for the film industry — and similar scenarios screenwriters might face down the road.

Rigorous, structured daydreaming

Craig and John take a look at an old post that found new life this week when it got picked up on Twitter and Reddit. We go beyond the bullet points to look at the process of writing a scene, from asking the basic questions to getting the words on the page.

The Germans have a word for it

Craig and John take a look at the class-action suit over Hollywood’s unpaid interns, then discuss envy and jealousy and other unproductive emotions.

We’d Like to Make an Offer

John and Craig discuss spec scripts, pitches and how it feels when your movie gets brutal reviews.

How screenwriters find their voice

Aline Brosh McKenna joins John and Craig for a conversation about what writers mean by a “voice,” and how it develops.

Villains

John and Craig give heroes the week off and talk bad guys. Not every movie needs a villain, but if you have one, he better be good.

The hyenas got a raw deal

The hyenas from The Lion King are hungry, yo.

Raiders of the Lost Ark

Craig and John spend the entire episode discussing and dissecting RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK, looking at both its structure and scene work.

The second letter in R&D stands for development

Variety’s David S. Cohen returns from CES with a warning that studios need to invest in R&D — but that’s why they hire screenwriters.

Today’s trends are tomorrow’s clichés

Eric D. Snider looks at patterns in 2012 movies.

Sprints, marathons and migrations

This week, I’ve been working on a feature, a TV pilot and the stage musical of Big Fish. It’s gotten me thinking about the nature of different forms of dramatic writing.

Unless they pay you, the answer is no

John and Craig return from the holidays to look at the WGA nominations, the perennially high costs of movies, scene headers and acceptable fonts for treatments.

Present tension

Robert Jackson Bennett looks at the benefits and drawback of writing fiction in the present tense.

Best of Outlines, Agents and Good Boy Syndrome

Craig and John start the year with a look back at three very early episodes not currently on iTunes, discussing outlines, agents and the Good Boy Syndrome.

Eggnog and Dreadlock Santa

It’s Christmas, so John and Craig are exchanging the gift of answers, tackling listener questions on topics ranging from musical books to punch-up sessions.

Talking Austen in Austin

Craig and John chat with Lindsay Doran, a producer and former studio exec who’s made terrific movies, ranging from Sense and Sensibility to Stranger than Fiction.

One-step deals, and how to read a script

Craig and John look at the logic and fallacies of one-step deals for screenwriters, along with advice on reading screenplays and enjoying Skyfall.

The Next 117 Pages

John and Craig talk about everything that comes after the oft-discussed First Three Pages, speculating on the kinds of issues they’d spot if they were looking at full scripts.

Workspace: Leo Chu & Eric S. Garcia

TV writing team Leo Chu & Eric S. Garcia discuss their workspace and work habits.

Workspace: Cherry Chevapravatdumrong

Family Guy writer (and YA novelist) Cherry Chevapravatdumrong discuss her workspace and work habits.

We’re all Disney princesses now

John and Craig discuss the big movie news of the week: Disney buying Lucasfilm, and with it, the rights to Star Wars.

Alt-universe panels

Craig and John ret-con the Austin Film Festival, placing themselves on panels in which they didn’t participate. It’s a chance to give the answers they would have given without the bother of moderators (and other people’s opinions).

Amazon Studios at AFF

A reader shares his notes on a Amazon Studios panel at this year’s Austin Film Festival.

The Black List, and a stack of scenes

Recording live at the Austin Film Festival, John and Craig take a look at The Black List’s pivot to a paid site, and what it means for screenwriters and the industry. Black List creator Franklin Leonard joins us for questions and criticism, as well as screenwriter Aline Brosh McKenna.

On the new Black List

Franklin Leonard, creator of The Black List, has announced a new incarnation of his site that allows screenwriters to upload their scripts for review and rating — for a fee.