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Film Industry

Blunt notes and Blade Runner

A Reddit user uncovered some [blunt Blade Runner notes, which are not at all uncommon.

Rhythm and Blues

John and Craig talk homesickness and daddy issues before diving into a discussion on what Rhythm and Hues’s bankruptcy means for the film industry — and similar scenarios screenwriters might face down the road.

The Germans have a word for it

Craig and John take a look at the class-action suit over Hollywood’s unpaid interns, then discuss envy and jealousy and other unproductive emotions.

We’d Like to Make an Offer

John and Craig discuss spec scripts, pitches and how it feels when your movie gets brutal reviews.

The second letter in R&D stands for development

Variety’s David S. Cohen returns from CES with a warning that studios need to invest in R&D — but that’s why they hire screenwriters.

Today’s trends are tomorrow’s clichés

Eric D. Snider looks at patterns in 2012 movies.

Best of Outlines, Agents and Good Boy Syndrome

Craig and John start the year with a look back at three very early episodes not currently on iTunes, discussing outlines, agents and the Good Boy Syndrome.

Talking Austen in Austin

Craig and John chat with Lindsay Doran, a producer and former studio exec who’s made terrific movies, ranging from Sense and Sensibility to Stranger than Fiction.

One-step deals, and how to read a script

Craig and John look at the logic and fallacies of one-step deals for screenwriters, along with advice on reading screenplays and enjoying Skyfall.

Amazon Studios at AFF

A reader shares his notes on a Amazon Studios panel at this year’s Austin Film Festival.

On the new Black List

Franklin Leonard, creator of The Black List, has announced a new incarnation of his site that allows screenwriters to upload their scripts for review and rating — for a fee.

Women, screenwriting and confidence

A listener wonders if the lack of female screenwriters stems in part from the social part of the profession, specifically confidence in one’s ability.

How the summer movie season expanded

Dustin Rowles looks at how studios learned to look beyond the summer release schedule.

Mistakes development executives make

Craig and John skip Comic-Con so they can discuss annoying and unproductive habits of development executives, along with advice for working with screenwriters.

Getting less for your 10%

Gavin Palone looks at why why so many more writers (and directors and actors) in Hollywood are paying the extra money for a manager.

Standing up for ticket-takers

Employees are suing AMC Theaters, arguing that they should be allowed to sit down.

Amazon Studios and the free option

Chip Street looks at why an offer to be featured on the “consider” list must be considered carefully.

Is screenwriting dead?

A working screenwriter shares his frustration with how difficult it has become to sustain a career.

20 Questions with John and Craig

John and Craig open the listener mailbag and sprint through twenty questions in just under an hour.

Confessions of a trust-fund screenwriter

In response to the discussion Craig and I recently had about the perceptions of nepotism and wealth in the film industry, a listener wrote in to share his experience of being quite literally a trust-fund screenwriter.

How cost-cutting hurt movies

Gregory Poirier argues that movies have suffered because of misguided cost-cutting, and forgetting that screenwriters are the research and development of the film industry.

Umbrage Farms

Craig and John take a brief look at the misguided Girls backlash and complaints about nepotism in Hollywood, before segueing to a bigger discussion of spec scripts and positioning.

Planning for opening titles

Karin Fong compares a great title sequence to raising the curtain before the show. By planning for opening titles at the script stage, you can help get your story started off right.

Amazon’s new deal for writers

Craig and John answer questions about specificity, television and what to do when your great idea sounds too much like a movie that’s already been made.

The pressure of PG-13

To some degree it’s a self-fulfilling prophecy: if you make most of your blockbusters PG-13, most blockbusters will be PG-13.